Hablitzia Tamnoides – Caucasian Spinach

I first heard of Hablitzia Tamnoides (or Caucasian Spinach) when I was searching for perennial salads.  These perennial climbers produce leaves that can be used young in salads, or the larger older leaves can be cooked like spinach.  I ordered seed from Incredible Vegetables, and they arrived with a comprehensive guide explaining how to grow them.  Mandy from Incredible Vegetables was also very helpful.  I followed her guidance, sowed some seed, and put it outside in the Autumn of 2017, as the seed needs a cold period to germinate.  However, it seemed that my seed couldn’t wait to get started, as it made an eager appearance soon after sowing.  This left me with the challenge of how to support the young seedlings through the winter, given that I didn’t have a greenhouse at the time.  I covered them with horticultural fleece and kept them close by, and they survived even the Siberian winter storm that we had in early 2018.  Eager, hardy little souls they were.  I was delighted with them.  Once I got my greenhouse early this year, I sowed some more, and this time they got the fridge stratification treatment.  I sowed them into pots, put them in the fridge for a few days, and then put them in the greenhouse.  Once again, they germinated promptly.  Here they are as young seedlings:

Hablitzia Tamnoides seedlings

Hablitzia Tamnoides seedlings

I planted out the ones that had managed to overwinter, along with some Claytonia miner’s lettuce that appeared out of nowhere (I had once grown it, so I guess there were seeds around):

Hablitzia Tamnoides young plants

Hablitzia Tamnoides young plants

These grew up happily, encouraged to climb a trellis against the back wall.  This is underneath a canopy of mature trees behind us, so is in a very shady position.  Hablitzia does seem to be happiest in shade in my garden:

Hablitzia Tamnoides growing on trellis

Hablitzia Tamnoides growing on trellis

It does have an interesting colour variation, in that it grows much paler when it is in sunlight.  The plants below have been grown up a wigwam of canes, and the front plants are in the sun whilst shading the plants behind them.  You can see that the front plants are a zesty lime-green, whilst the plants behind are darker.  The lime green makes a wonderful contrast with the verbena bonariensis next to it:

Hablitzia Tamnoides on wigwam

Hablitzia Tamnoides on wigwam

I’ve not taken much from the plants in this, their first year, but I have had a few of the smaller leaves in salads, and I harvested some of the larger leaves for cooking:

Hablitzia Tamnoides leaf harvested

Hablitzia Tamnoides leaf harvested

The leaves were wilted for 2-3 minutes in boiling water.  The texture is not as ‘limp’ as spinach, but has more ‘mouthfeel’ which is rather pleasant.  I mixed them with red veined sorrel for additional flavour, but I’d be quite happy just eating the Hablitzia on their own.  They have a spinach-like flavour, a more chewy texture, and don’t wilt down as much.  On the whole, I’m really happy with this addition to my edible perennial vegetables, and they seem to grow very happily indeed in West Yorkshire.  Happy days.

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